Recent news

  • Journalism for Development is a non-Government organization founded at the initiative of the journalists at The Mongolian Mining Journal in 2010.
  • ​​​​​​​MRPAM Deputy Director M.Enkhjargal tells G. Iderkhangai that while stable state policy is the priority for foreign investment in the exploration sector to resume in Mongolia, some other things should also be done to woo investors.
  • More than 150 exhibitors from countries such as United States of America, United Kingdom, China, Russia, the Czech Republic, Australia, Kazakhstan, Sweden, Japan, Germany, South Korea, Italy, Belarus, France and Canada will introduce the latest technology and equipment in the mining and heavy industry.
  • E.Odjargal talks to B.Bayarsaikhan, Head of the National Development Agency, on the success or otherwise of the Public Investment Programme and other such moves in bringing in foreign direct investment, and on how to protect the investment climate from political instability.
  • By signing on the very last day of 2018 an agreement on Oyu Tolgoi sourcing power from inside the country, Ts. Davaasuren, Minister of Energy, G.Batsukh, Chairman of the Board of Directors at Oyu Tolgoi, and Armando Torres, the company’s CEO, took the actual implementation of the long-discussed Tavan Tolgoi power plant mega project one big step forward.
  • On January 7, 2019, G. Zandanshatar, Head of the Cabinet Secretariat, issued directives tothe Ministry of Mining and Heavy Industry (MMHI) and the Mineral Resources and Petroleum Authority (MRPAM) to transfer the ownership of the Asgat polymetallic deposit from Mongolrostsvetmet to the state-owned Erdenes Mongol.
  • Events in the past few weeks cannot but make us wonder where the state policy on the mineral sector is headed. A special operation with soldiers and police personnel was undertaken to clear the Salkhit silver mine of all activities by its licence holders.
  • Assignment title: Selection of a Consultant to develop a detailed feasibility study on the construction of a copper concentrate smelting and refining plant in Mongolia.
  • The Ministry of Mining and Heavy Industry of Mongolia now invites eligible consulting firms (“Consultants”) to express their interest in developing a detailed feasibility study on the construction of a copper concentrate smelting and refining plant in Mongolia.
  • The revelation by the Mineral Resources and Petroleum Authority that for quite some time now there has been no new registration of any western investor in the exploration sector merely confirms what is common knowledge. Serious and tenacious American, Australian and Canadian investors have left Mongolia.
  • More than 150 exhibitors from countries such as United States of America, United Kingdom, China, Russia, the Czech Republic, Australia, Kazakhstan, Sweden, Japan, Germany, South Korea, Italy, Belarus, France and Canada will introduce the latest technology and equipment in the mining and heavy industry.
  • E.Odjargal talks to B.Bayarsaikhan, Head of the National Development Agency, on the success or otherwise of the Public Investment Programme and other such moves in bringing in foreign direct investment, and on how to protect the investment climate from political instability.
  • On January 7, 2019, G. Zandanshatar, Head of the Cabinet Secretariat, issued directives tothe Ministry of Mining and Heavy Industry (MMHI) and the Mineral Resources and Petroleum Authority (MRPAM) to transfer the ownership of the Asgat polymetallic deposit from Mongolrostsvetmet to the state-owned Erdenes Mongol.
  • By signing on the very last day of 2018 an agreement on Oyu Tolgoi sourcing power from inside the country, Ts. Davaasuren, Minister of Energy, G.Batsukh, Chairman of the Board of Directors at Oyu Tolgoi, and Armando Torres, the company’s CEO, took the actual implementation of the long-discussed Tavan Tolgoi power plant mega project one big step forward.
  • Umnugobi aimag. Mukhar Shivert
    Photo by R.Delger /MMJ/
  • Events in the past few weeks cannot but make us wonder where the state policy on the mineral sector is headed. A special operation with soldiers and police personnel was undertaken to clear the Salkhit silver mine of all activities by its licence holders.
  • In recent years, demand for meat products has risen sharply because of the rapid development of the mining sector, which now accounts for 90% of Mongolia’s gross industrial product, and employs 60,000 people.
  • Mongolia leads other countries in the excessive number of policies, decisions, rules and regulations around its investment climate,” emphasized Ms. Christine Zhenwei Qiang, Practice Manager for the Global Investment and Competition Unit of the World Bank Group’s Macro, Trade and Investment (MTI) Global Practice, at the Economic Forum in May.
  • Following the completion of an independent Preliminary Economic Assessment (PEA) study for its 100%-owned Khundii Gold Project in southwest Mongolia, Erdene Resource Development Corp. (TSX:ERD MSE:ERDN) has drawn particular attention to the following results of the PEA.
  • John Oberg, CEO, Sandvik Mongolia, answers questions from MMJ on his company’s work in the geological and mining sectors.
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LATEST

  • 2021-12-01 11:56
    Energy sector has been experiencing years of hardship. Of course, Covid-19 has affected the energy sector. It has been a while since the government decided to zero out electricity and heating tariffs in order to boost the economy. This decision had an impact on energy sector load. How is the energy load now?  Mongolian energy consumption grows at about 4-6 percent per annum. In 2020, total electricity and energy consumption was 8,850.50 million kW/h.  Domestic production from power plants, renewable sources and diesel power plant accounted for 80.7 percent and the remaining 19.3 was imported.
  • 2021-11-17 13:57
    Alongside the COVID-19 pandemic, the energy crisis has begun to affect the world. By October, gas prices in Europe had increased fivefold due to supply shortages. Oil supply shortages have also followed. The current instability of world’s economies is largely due to the pandemic, but there are many other contributory factors. At the heart of the crisis lies the challenge of reducing greenhouse gas emissions while ensuring a reliable supply of energy. Countries have imposed several short and long quarantines over the past two years to prevent infection spread.  A consequence has been disruption of business relations between countries and reductions in production which, in turn reduced energy consumption.
  • 2021-11-11 14:03
    Why is amending the Investment Law being discussed in an ambiguous and secretive manner?    It should, instead, be thoroughly prepared by the working group of the relevant ministry, and the public consulted. This is clearly required by the Law on Development Policy and Planning, and the Law on Legislation   Article 8.1.5 of the latter indicates that “draft legislation shall be discussed and collect feedback from citizens, representatives of legal entities and public whose legal interests are affected”.  One of the bills that came as a sudden “surprise” without public discussion was the Investment Law. The general concept and content of the draft law have been introduced by relevant officials, but its detailed articles and provisions have not been clarified.     
  • 2021-11-01 10:46
    MMJ spoke with the economist N.Enkhbayar about opportunities to expand Mongolia’s economy, global technology trends, and the implementation of major projects as well as the potential to attract foreign direct investment.  How do you see the current state of the Mongolian economy and foreign investment? In 2010 Mongolia’s economy “rocketed”. At that time, foreign investment exceeded GDP by almost 110 percent. Currently, the foreign investment stands at $2.7 billion, that does not reach even 20 percent of the GDP. Our politicians consider the 5 to 6 percent annual economic growth reported by statistical indicators as good. For us researchers, this is a small number and is considered insignificant for a small economy to grow at this rate for 30 years.
  • 2021-10-22 15:35
    During the last year, Mongolia’s external debt has increased by over $1 billion. Specifically, the first quarter government debt was 15.7 percent higher than during the same period last year. There is an expectation that the country’s external debt will continue to grow till the end of this year, but it would “easily fit” within the 70 percent limit set by law. The Ministry of Finance even presented an estimate indicating that this year’s total will be lower than the previous year compared to the GDP. According to the previous Fiscal Stability Law, the balance of government debt should have been kept at 60 percent of GDP this year. The implementation of this requirement has been delayed to 2024 under a budget amendment and is a result of the pandemic impacting the government’s goal. It is not a secret that the country
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